D.C. photo exhibit features Stanley-area landscapes

The rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building boasts photos of central Idaho's abundant salmon habitat this week, June 13 - 17. (Photo courtesy Sen. Mike Crapo's office)

The marbled atmosphere of the Russell Senate Office Building rotunda has come to life this week with images of central Idaho’s abundant wild landscapes, crystal-clear streams and pristine wildlife habitat.

Sponsored by Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, the exhibit celebrates Idaho’s wild lands and rivers. Susan Wheeler, Crapo’s Washington, D.C. Chief of Staff, delivered an address on behalf of the senator during an opening reception for the exhibit on Tuesday, June 14. The rotunda exhibit will be on display June 13 – 17.

Captured during two visits to the environs in and around Stanley and the Sawtooth Valley last summer, the photographs are the work of environmental photographer Neil Ever Osborne of the International League of Conservation Photographers (ILCP). The project is part of ILCP’s Tripods in the Mud initiative, which partners environmental photographers with conservation organizations.

“Neil’s photographs are symbolic of the salmon and steelhead that we know we need to save and the habitat needed to sustain them,” Crapo said. “I am glad to have the opportunity to co-sponsor this photo exhibit and pay tribute to the wild salmon of the Pacific Northwest.”

IRU Assistant Policy Director Greg Stahl spent a week in June 2010 on the ground with Osborne.

“From the headwaters of the Salmon River to the meanders of Bear Valley Creek, Neil did a great job of capturing central Idaho’s beautiful landscapes,” Stahl said. “These photographs of Idaho’s abundant salmon habitat celebrate that country.

“Idahoans are rightfully proud to have their state’s beauty featured in the nation’s capital, and we thank Senator Crapo for making it happen.”

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Click here to read an essay by Greg Stahl on the week he spent with Osborne and Save Our Wild Salmon communications specialist Emily Nuchols in central Idaho last summer.